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As You Like It by William Shakespeare | Audio Drama All Parts

Welcome to our audio drama production of William Shakespeare’s pastoral & whimsical As You Like It. Featuring Rosalind – Shakespeare’s largest female role, this production was originally broadcast in our Lunch Hours podcast in October 2020.

Production Team

Director: Claire Martin

Cast

(with their Venmo and/or CashApp tags, in case you want to send them a tip):
Edmond Clark as Orlando
Tyrone Kiaku as Adam/Sir Oliver Martext
William R. Bartley as LeBeau/Jacques
Jordan Beck as Oliver
Ronald Román-Meléndez as Charles the Wrestler/Silvius/Lord
Jillian Robinson as Celia
Alexandra Stroud as Rosalind
Alex Osbourne as Touchstone
Claire F. Martin as Audrey/Second Lady
Michael Morét as Duke Frederick/William
Raechel Fisher as Duchess Senior
Siena Brown as Amiens
Kelsey Peterson as Phoebe/First Lady
Rebecca Lashmar as Hisperia/Corinne

The Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours | As You Like It Reading Pt. 2

Brought  to you by Sweet Tea Shakespeare, this full cast reading of As You Like  It Part 2 was directed by Assistant Artistic Director Claire Martin.
Orlando, Edmond Clark
Adam / Sir Oliver Martext, Tyrone Kiaku
Le Beau / Jacques , William R. Bartley
Oliver, Jordan Beck
Charles the Wrestler / Lord / Silvius, Ronald Román-Meléndez
Celia , Jillian Robinson
Rosalind, Alexandra Stroud
Touchstone, Alex Osbourne
Second Lady / Audrey, Claire F. Martin
Duke Frederick / William, Michael Morét
Duchess Senior, Raechel Fisher
Amiens, Siena Brown
First Lady / Phoebe, Kelsey Petersen
Hisperia / Corinne, Rebecca Lashmar
Welcome to the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours, where we spend time well by spending it together. Think of the Hours as a way to pass the time   around a common table of ideas. We’re a community seeking to delight in story, song, and stagecraft even as we confront a world of change and challenge.
You can find our whole catalogue here.
The Hours are only possible because of regular support from our monthly sustainers and patrons. Please consider making a monthly pledge on Patreon. With options beginning at just $5, and plenty of great perks, you’ll find a great way to join the STS family.
You can always contact the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours at hours@sweetteashakespeare.com.
JOIN our Facebook community here.
The show is produced by Claire Martin and Jeremy Fiebig and edited by Ashanti Bennett.
Jen Pommerenke and Julie Schaefer also assisted with this episode.
Consider following us on social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Twitch
This project is supported by the Arts Council in part by contributions from businesses and individuals, and through grants from the City of Fayetteville, Cumberland County and the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural   Resources.

The Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours Intensive | As You Like It

Brought to you by Sweet Tea Shakespeare, this full cast reading of As You Like It Part 1 was directed by Assistant Artistic Director Claire Martin.

Orlando, ​​​​​Edmond Clark

Adam / Sir Oliver Martext,​​ ​Tyrone Kiaku

Le Beau / Jacques​,​​ William R. Bartley

Oliver,​ ​​​​​Jordan Beck

Charles the Wrestler / Lord / Silvius, ​Ronald Román-Meléndez

Celia​​​​​​, Jillian Robinson

Rosalind, ​​​​​Alexandra Stroud

Touchstone, ​​​​​Alex Osbourne

Second Lady / Audrey, ​​​Claire F. Martin

Duke Frederick / William, ​​​Michael Morét

Duchess Senior, ​​​​Raechel Fisher

Amiens, ​​​​​Siena Brown

First Lady / Phoebe, ​​​​Kelsey Petersen

Hisperia / Corinne, ​​​​Rebecca Lashmar

Welcome to the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours, where we spend time well by spending it together. Think of the Hours as a way to pass the time around a common table of ideas. We’re a community seeking to delight in story, song, and stagecraft even as we confront a world of change and challenge.

You can find our whole catalogue here.

The Hours are only possible because of regular support from our monthly sustainers and patrons. Please consider making a monthly pledge on Patreon. With options beginning at just $5, and plenty of great perks, you’ll find a great way to join the STS family.

You can always contact the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours at hours@sweetteashakespeare.com.

JOIN our Facebook community here.

The show is produced by Claire Martin and Jeremy Fiebig and edited by Ashanti Bennett.

Jen Pommerenke and Julie Schaefer also assisted with this episode.

Consider following us on social media: FacebookTwitter, InstagramYouTubeTwitch

This project is supported by the Arts Council in part by contributions from businesses and individuals, and through grants from the City of Fayetteville, Cumberland County and the North Carolina  Arts  Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural  Resources.

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2

00:01:05
Hello, welcome to the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours where we spend time. Well, by spending it together I’m Claire Martin and thank you so much for joining us. My name is Claire Martin and I need Assistant Artistic Director of Sweet Tea Shakespeare and I’m joined here today by a Jeremy Fiebig the artistic director Director and a new friend of ours will Bartley the artistic director of KOP. A fem LOC is a theater company based in Toronto Canada.

2

00:01:35
Well, thank you so much for joining us today. It’s great to have you on the show. Thank you for having me

0

00:01:40
And to be a part of the conversation.

2

00:01:43
So today we are taking a deep dive into Shakespeare’s pastoral comedy As You Like It will. And I have been kinda in each of these orbits for a few months. Now we met doing a drug Shakespeare game, which is how all the best friendships start. And then from there, we just sort of continue to stay in touch. I have appeared as a guest on a couple of hemlocks podcast in the past, and recently we each submitted seven actors to a full cast, zoom SU zoom reading of As You Like It.

2

00:02:16
We used an adaptation that I had done, and that will be dropping as a podcast some time soon, we’ll read for a Jacqui’s B to B melancholic sardonic, a forest dweller with the Duke. I was supposed to read stage directions and ended up reading for Audrey, which was hilarious. And today we’re just going to say, we’re just going to dive into the play because it is an absolute gold mine and deservedly, one of Shakespeare’s most beloved comedies.

2

00:02:46
So the first thing I’d love to ask for, for both of you guys is like a, one of your experience a past and present with As You Like It and what draws you to the play?

1

00:02:59
Well, I suppose

3

00:03:00
I can jump on that one first in truth. Like I’ve read this place so many times. It’s one of my favorites. When I look back on the entire Canon for Shakespeare, my unfortunate side of it is that I’ve never actually been able to be a part of a production. And the most experience I have with it is taking a lot of soliloquies of monologues from It and refining it as an actor as well. So I was very excited to get through one full reading of it, and then to also play my favorite character, Jake, see just from the entire Canon, he is just so early and cynical and facetious all the time. And so being able to bring that to lighten to the reading was a lot of fun for me.

3

00:03:33
So I’m hoping that moving forward in the future, at some point, I’ll have a chance to maybe direct the play or act in, in, in some capacity

4

00:03:40
And you’ve written a play based on it.

3

00:03:42
That is very true. Yeah. I’m currently developing a play a that is based on the seven ages of man, a speech, all the world’s a stage a where basically using the seven ages that Jake We breaks down in terms of what our roles are in life. I represent seven different archetypes of Shakespeare’s characters on the stage. I just shake, we kind of move through them and a, and a very, which how they show up, I guess, in a very shake we way of killing off these archetypes as a way to rediscover his own identity, which I believe is a big struggle of the character for the, the play of As You Like It as well.

3

00:04:16
So, yeah.

4

00:04:18
Awesome. Jeremy you have an, you have a storied history with display.

3

00:04:23
Oh my gosh. Yeah. So I think my history with this play began with production. I was an assistant director and, and a stage manager for the American Shakespeare center in 2006. And I heard that play many dozens of times as a part of that process. And then since then, since coming to Fayetteville, I directed it at the Gilbert theater and played the Dukes in that production Sweet Tea Shakespeare has done it sort of won.

3

00:04:59
And a half times sorta we did, and then a Renaissance style production with some friends of ours at a, the black forest conference a few years ago. And then right after that, we did a full production that I, that I could record. And, and then I directed it last summer at who’s your shakes in Indiana? So well, and I was in at once. I, I like I did play, I did play Jacqui’s The like the summer after my first year of teaching, I went to pigeon Creek Shaks in Michigan and played jQuery.

3

00:05:39
Is there,

4

00:05:41
Was it fun?

3

00:05:44
It was fun. I love that character. I think he’s the, he’s a brilliant a*****e. And a, I just love it. If I could ask you, I mean, Jake, we have some of the best speeches in all of the Canon and yet so many of them in this play, which was your favorite while you were playing a character. The my favorite to play his is, is one of the ones where he’s describing touchstone on the kind of having the conversation with touchstone at the same time.

3

00:06:16
And there’s just a, umm, just a great Like its almost like a patter song, a verse right there. And I just love it. It was fun to do

2

00:06:27
That is one of the best Shakespeare entrances when he comes in and just immediately starts with a fool, a fool. I met a fool in the forest. I’m like, it doesn’t, it doesn’t get much more delightful or I don’t know, Like buoyant than that, those like that like the triple exclamation marks and just the, you know, the repetition of that word. Yeah. It’s a fun, that’s a, that’s a really sort of jazzy entrance. It’s one of my, one of my favorite walk-ins yeah.

3

00:06:55
Well I find it to like, well I’m sure we’ll get into it during the conversation here, but I find it so interesting too. One of the only characters aqueous seems to take join in and the excitement and is a touch stone. Yeah. Like he is so excited to talk about touchstone in his entire involvement in the In at the plot itself. And then we have other characters who play music, but he’s very demanding and cynical towards them. So yeah, it was nice to see that other side of Jake We coming through with the presence of touchstone in the place. So yeah.

2

00:07:20
Awesome. Well the first thing we want to do just like with Love’s Labour’s lost, I’m going to do just a brief rundown of the plot so that we know what’s going on in this funky flight. If I, if there are any holes or issues as they come up, please, please correct me. Basically. This place is a, it is a sparkling romantic comedy that starts in completely the opposite vein. So we opened at the court of Duke Frederick, who is actually a usurper. So he is the younger brother, a of the sort of authentic legitimate Duke who is, who is foisted out and sort of taken over control of his kingdom.

2

00:07:58
And so Duke Fredrik has a daughter named to Celia and Duke senior is elder brother and who is banished. A also has a daughter named Rosalyn and Rosalind is living in the court with Duke Fredrick and Celia because the, the cousins Celia and Rose are like the best of friends and eternally loyal to each other. And so Frederick has allowed his niece, ah, to reside with him, even though she’s the daughter of the brother that he, that he chased off the throne.

2

00:08:30
We also have more sort of family drama. We have these two brothers Oliver, the elder and Orlando, the boys, they are the S they are the sons of a nobleman who is now deceased, who was loyal to Duke senior Rosalyn’s Spanish father all over is a, quite a Hottie and to sort of insanely jealous of his younger brother. And so for, for reasons that he mostly keeps to himself, he has sort of cut all a cut Orlando’s inheritance off.

2

00:09:05
So Orlando’s is not getting any of the money that he was promised by his father. And he hasn’t gotten any of the education or privilege that should, we sort of should come along with his rank. And so there’s tension between the brothers, the very, very first scene play features, then getting into a literal fist fight. So there is like there’s there’s family, family tensions, a mug in this court. The first kind of major plot point we have is that Orlando decides that he is going to challenge Charles, the wrestler who’s this like a gargantuan, a behemoth Mann, who is, who is, who wrestles for the pleasure of the court.

2

00:09:39
It’s a sport that they can all watch or decides to wrestle him and all of her things. This is great because the likelihood that his, you know, weakling brother will get absolutely snapped in half is very high. So he’s all for this Rosalyn and Celia. Meanwhile, along with a fool in the court named touchstone, they decide that they’re going to watch the wrestling match. They try to dissuade Orlando from It. They can’t, he’s pretty dead set. Its got a bit of a suicidal thing going Orlando and Rosalind have a meet cute and fall instantly, if not in love, then they’re just instantly smitten with each other.

2

00:10:14
A to the point that Orlando was literally struck down in camp, can’t talk

5

00:10:19
Amazing

2

00:10:20
In Orlando wins the wrestling match. When we did the reading, we had a lot of theories as to how but Orlando wins and, and Rosalyn gives him a necklace around her neck to where in the old sort of iconic tradition of the lovers exchanging favors and no sooner has this kind of fledgling romance begun. Then Duke Frederick decides that it has gotten too dangerous. Having the, a beautiful, witty self-possessed Rosalind at the court as a reminder to everyone I’m of the injustice that he has done to her father.

2

00:10:52
So Duke Frederick banishes Rosalyn says get out of my, get out of my kingdom, get out of my car. And Celia decides to go with her. She says, if you were banished than I am to screw my dad, let’s, let’s run away into the forest together. They decided to run into the forest of Arden, which is where a Duke senior Rosalyn’s father has been hiding out with a bunch of the Lords, including Jake wes’ and for their own safety. The girls decide that Rosalind will disguise herself as a boy and go by the name Ganymede and Celia will pose as a peasant named Aliana his sister.

2

00:11:29
And so in that way, they can be tied together, but they sort of have this additional safety net of the, the appearance of a man traveling with them. They also decide to bring touchstone. Cause if your going on a road trip, you want the one that’s going to crack all the jokes. So they all run into the forest of Arden. Meanwhile, Oliver decides that that is a pretty good idea to is to his own brother. So he tells Orlando, he, we first tried set him on fire. God, this is a weird, like he tries to, he tries to at least decides he’s going to Like maybe set the house on fire, wherever Orlando lives, Orlando escapes that.

2

00:12:00
And a along with their man servant Adam who served their father when he was alive, Adam and Orlando also run into the forest of Martin to flee Oliver’s rats. We have all have our quote unquote good characters running into the forest and we have our leading heroine in a, in cross dress. So then we sort of, then we sort of the whole tenor of the place shifts as the location of the place shifts from this very cold autocratic male dominated court into, into this sort of pastoral fairytale of a forest.

2

00:12:30
The forest of artists were we meet to Duke sr Rosalyn’s father and his Merry men. Basically some of whom our Lord’s that sort of followed him into banishment. Jake we use is the Duke’s companion and is kind of what a touchstone is for the girls. jQuery is provides a amusement and sort of sardonic a commentary on the world around them. He’s much more melancholy in much more cynical than a touchstone.

4

00:12:58
The, the F,

2

00:13:00
The friendship and comradery and humor that he provides with the Duke is similar to what touchstone is offering to the girls. And so then sort of from then on were in were much more into a traditional romantic comedy Orlando connects with Duke senior and sort of finds his way to the It

4

00:13:18
And the enclave. And once he is

2

00:13:21
He’s, once he’s settled, he starts writing love poems to Rosalyn and pinning it up on trees, Rosalind and Celia and touchstone fight in some of these poems and read them and they are horrendous and Celia in touchstone, Like give Rosalyn so much crap for how head-over-heels her, her, her boys, and love. And then Rosalind meets Orlando. In of course she is dressed as a boy and she decides to, to have some fun with him and also to test his love. And so she approaches him as Ganymede well, she does not reveal her true identity.

2

00:13:55
And she tells Orlando that if he is truly in love, she can cure him of his love sickness. All he has to do is visit her every day and call a hymn. Her pronouns are a really hard when talking about this play a woo Ganymede basically by calling Ganymede Rosalind. And so this double role play sort of emerges. That becomes a long extension of, of sort of a wooing seen in reverse in which Rosalyn, as Ganymede, as Rosalind basically puts Orlando through his paces to, to sort of puncture his more idealistic notions of love and, and introduce him to Like

4

00:14:34
The full a miracle and Magnus of loving a woman.

2

00:14:40
Meanwhile, there are like shepherds and shepherds is that our running a muck. And so we have a poor besotted shepherd named Silvia is chasing this really sort of hot sassy when she named Phoebe, who could not be more disdainful to him, could not be less interested and they have some really fun back and forth. Phoebe and Sylvia, we run into Rosalyn dresses. Ganymede in a true kind of 12th night fashion. Phoebe falls in love with, Ganymede not realizing it’s a woman. And so we have a love triangle that emerges. I mean, it’s really more like a love rectangle, but Sylvia, some Phoebe don’t know about Orlando.

2

00:15:15
And I mean, while touchdown has Like, he’s got the house that’s for this hot shepherdess named Audrey. And so all of these are all of these love stories began emerging. Umm, at one point we have all of her come into the forest and Olivers had changed a part and he meets Celia and they fall in love at first sight. So by the time we get to the end of this play, Rosalind is in a position where she has to sort of reveal herself as a her and also reveal that she has been sort of responsible for so many of the relationships that have developed in the woods.

2

00:15:48
And we get this sort of remarkable final scene in which she and Celia go off together. And then they come back on and Rosalind is now dressed as a woman and Duke sr in Orlando are like, Oh my gosh, I’m in. So she re reconciled, she reunites with our father and she promised this to marry Orlando, Phoebe promises to marry Sylvia because she can no longer be with the, with the enemy because the enemy isn’t a real. And then we have this double double day ASX Mokena where Hyman, the literal God of marriage arrives.

2

00:16:20
And Like makes, you know, these Like just sings a song about how marriage is wonderful and he’s going to sort of conjure all of these marriages. And we also have a J a Jack, the boy, the, the middle brother at Orlando and Oliver who has been away in school. He arrives in says, Duke Fredrick has met at a religious man in how to change your heart. He has, he is decided to leave his pretensions to the throne like Duke senior. You can go back to court. Now you can be back in charge. All of the sort of social instability has been rectified.

2

00:16:52
Everything is put back in order. And we end with, with that sort of those four marriages and that promise of the Duke Duke senior re attaining the throne and Jake MES tells him I’m going to join Duke Fredrick in exile and, and do the sort of monastic life. And so, ah, and then everybody dances because its kind of funny. So yeah, it’s four Shakespeare and comedy. It is fairly, it is fairly light and cheery at the beginning.

2

00:17:23
The first act is not. And I think Jacqui’s is a departure at the very end is, are one kind of, that’s our one melancholy note that we end on. Right. But it is. I mean it’s how about as Jubril and, and ending as you can get its got, I don’t know if there’s a Shakespeare play with more marriages at the end then as you might get, I think four is, I mean people well watch and correct me if I’m wrong, but I think this is like the most people are getting married at once I think is a record for Shakespeare

0

00:17:53
Its a lot. Yeah. That’s Our place. I think merchants is the next one to three marriages at the end, right? Something like that. Hmm. If we did it, we got through it all re quite a plot,

2

00:18:07
The card, it’s a hard one to distill, like I tried, but there’s to many people and they do too many weird things for me to condense it anymore. So sorry about that. You had to listen to me rant for a while.

0

00:18:22
It’s okay. But I think it unpacks the, actually the complexity of the plot unlocked some of what I think we’re supposed to understand about this play, which is almost that its not about the plot at all. And so well I’m sure we’ll dig into that as well.

2

00:18:41
Well, and we talked about when we did Love’s Labour’s how the plot for that play could not be thinner. Basically. We need the boys’ to make this resolution not to fall in love and that we need for girls. And other than that, everything that happens is just kind of wordplay. Whereas in this play so much happens. Like even though there aren’t, it’s not like there’s a billion of the patients they’re really are all in two, but like the The what is happening in those relationships and like as motivations are changing and his characters are pursuing goals, like they’re is just a lot of stuff going on.

2

00:19:11
Well, I’d love to, I’d love to hear about the historical context in which Shakespeare was writing As You Like It like the point where he was at in his career and kind of what, where this place situated in his own body of work.

0

00:19:23
Yeah. So I’m happy to jump on part of this. I mean, so the, the most reason argument about the historical context of this particular play or the most highest profile most recent is, is from Jim Shapiro’s book 1599 in which he, his argument is that this play is being written around the same time as Hamlet and a few other, a few other things that he’s working on in the that’s is a part of his argument is that, that As You Like It and Hamlet are being written sort of As sorta with the same, same, same issues in mind that, that As You Like It is in many respects the anti Hamlet.

0

00:20:19
So whereas Hamlet is This but they have this same kind of DNA Hamlin is this, you know, verbose moody in a sort of, of the guy who thinks about his inner world and Rosalind is his opposite and extra still, still wordy, but not quite not driven by mood is concerned with the external world in, in, in opposition to hamlets in the world. And, and so you see like a, this idea that Shakespeare might have been flexing his muscles in one way I’m with Hamlet and then stretching them in the opposite direction with As You Like It I do think like, so, so this play is it’s in a novel I’m, so Shakespeare would of been reading the As You Like It story.

0

00:21:13
He makes several change. He keeps the plot, but made several changes to the character and it’s based or comes out of a tradition or speaks to you a tradition that began with Arcadia in the early 1580s. And she’s a Sydney poetic work that sorta in launched a Vogue in, in sort of this idealistic exterior, a foreign life and world and the values that it had standing in opposition to the sort of cramped urban legalistic world of the city.

0

00:21:59
And so it was so influential and so popular that, you know, Shakespeare sort of sticks his hands in at many times over the course of his career, but really tackles it head on in this piece. And I think in terms of just a general context here, one of the things I was looking for when a play like As You Like It comes along, which has on the abundance of meaty female characters is that that year, that time Shakespeare bad at his Beck.

0

00:22:33
A lot about have a young boys from the, the local planning companies who were available and adept at doing what they needed to do. And there’s some really great Rosalind of course, Celia and Phoebe are three of these just sort of precocious characters that sort of signify that they don’t get written a couple of years earlier or a couple of years later, but because a Shakespeare Scott, these boys As ah, and needs to give them something to do a play like As You, Like It happens.

0

00:23:15
So I mean like its like the, like the, the tiniest nutshell possible, I suppose, but it’s this is not the only play that or Shakespeare is playing around with this. He does do it in Love’s Labour’s last to some degree it does. As You Like It also has a kind of a fairytale quality to it, evil Duke and a and M and to this sort of rescue operation that kind of happens and a restoration at the end that reminds us, I think of Al’s well, that ends well is something like that.

0

00:23:51
And, and even to, to merchant in the way that the merchant has this sort of idealistic place, that it ends in the Belmont, everything is restored and in merchant it’s a real problem. Don’t get me wrong. But I think there’s a, there’s a, there’s a kind of common DNA from As You, Like It two to those places that are doing that type of thing. Same thing with a Midsummer where they’re is an ideal world where realization and self-realization and coupling takes place in that other place.

0

00:24:34
And, and I think for me, As, You Like It is that play about, is the place if its about nothing else, its about that coupling and what that coupling means sort of at our sort of cartoon superficial theatrical level I’m with some of these characters and then at a real human level at umm, with some of these other characters like Rosalyn in Orlando, in Roslyn, in Celia.

2

00:25:03
I also love the idea of have this place as an antique Hamlet because, and Rosalyn in Hamlet, specifically being antithetical to each other because Hamlet spends his whole play during about whether to do and what to do. Rosalind just does over and over again. She just, she is the actor Manager of this play, everything. She, she, and she even says too to us, the audience, she says, I’m going to be an actor on the stage.

2

00:25:35
And when she, when she is going to see Silvius and Phoebe, she Like inserts herself until the middle of their drama and tries to tell each of them what to do. So its not just in her relationship with Orlando that she, that she sort of exhibits this assertiveness and a, and sort of fearless action that sort of few women do in these early modern plays. But it’s, it’s not just with her, her lover it’s with all the characters and when she has her, impeccables one of her final speeches to Orlando where she says, I, you know, I can do strange things.

2

00:26:13
It to me, that’s, that’s her way of retroactively bragging about the fact that she has been orchestrating so much of what actually happens in the play it’s her, you know, she’s banished. And so she is forced out of the castle, but every decision she makes after they leave it, it stems from her own, her own desire and her own impulses. It including the decision to dress as a boy. And so it’s, that’s very, and it’s very, for me, has a, as a female identifying performer because if we think of Roslyn Hamlet as being two of Shakespeare’s greatest creations, the fact that the character who, who boldly ventures forth and takes action as the female and that the character who gets stuck in his own head and doesn’t know what to do and, and struggles to take action as a boy like that is that’s very affirming for me.

2

00:27:05
And then also is a really, to me like that’s a really truthful way of approaching character. It seems like Shakespeare was, was not hemmed in by the need to appease certain gender roles. He just wrote What what felt true. And a woman like Rosalyn saying, you know, if you try to stop a woman’s wit it’s gonna find cracks, it’s gonna find a way out. Cause women just aren’t like women’s intelligence is irrepressible for her to say something like that. To me, that like, I don’t know, it’s just, it, it doesn’t get much better.

3

00:27:41
I find it too interesting bringing up the point of handling, being the antithesis of this play and a lot of ways because the there’s a very similar character dynamics in both the plays as well in terms of like the, the people, the characters that associate themselves with each other. I mean the wit and creativity and, and word playing banter that exists between Rosalind and Celia. You can really catch that a lot with the Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, and then you have to shake. We are representing this very internalized, thoughtful character, obviously Hamlet’s within that as well. And there are a lot of comparisons you can take Orlando and Oliver and kind of find comparisons to a ratio as well. But then also the whole theme and dynamic have two brothers that play for dominance and a rulership have a certain area.

3

00:28:18
Then obviously in Hamlin, that’s been resolved by the state of the play and this one is currently at a debate. So I just find it interesting that the character dynamics also exist just in slightly different variants at these characters as well. So,

2

00:28:30
And one of the things we talked about in our, in our post show discussion, I don’t know if you were here for this part. Well, cause we will have to duck out early. Umm, but we, we talked about how the fact that women have an extraordinary amount of agency and this play like in an unprecedented amount of agency in this play for an early modern play is part of what contributes to its a comedic by which I mean happy ending the fact that the fact that women take charge and the women make decisions as part of why things end well, I mean Warlando is, is it a darling?

2

00:29:03
But he isn’t a train wreck as a human being. And I hit the, the, the, the fullest expression of his love that he can fathom is writing his poetry and pending it on trees. But Like, he can’t when he’s confronted with the woman he loves, he can’t even speak to her. He’s so nervous. And so if Rosalyn didn’t sort of approach him as Ganymede dare him to be sort of Tea to join her in this extended roleplay, if she didn’t probe him in Like precon in to doing it, they may never have had a romantic conclusion.

2

00:29:33
They may never have found their way to marriage because he doesn’t seem Orlando’s. It doesn’t seem to have the personality, a, of a man who could even a girl on a date, let alone ask her to marry him. And so similarly to Juliet at the balcony scene, it was like, so our, we, are we doing this? Why are we getting married? I feel like Rosalyn has a similar, you know, in the final scene, she’s like, don’t worry. Like you’re going to get to marry her, but the Orlando is then spared from having to actually pop the questions. And so in my adaptation, I read gendered some of the characters in order to Like ratify that idea even more that it’s when women are in control and when women have some agency that, that the ending has the potential to be happier and a, and the reconciliation and reunions and forgiveness becomes more possible.

2

00:30:25
And I think that in that way, Jeremy what you were saying about, you know, the restoration at the end of how near some of these other places. I actually feel like this play has a lot in common with a sibling. I think in many ways like the, those two are connected. It’s not just the fairy tale, ethos of the story, but its also the fact that Like like all of the other kind of romances, but I think especially with sibling, it is The, it is the agency have the female heroine that enables and, and genders and ending that is sort of like hopeful and affirmational Like it’s if in a Jen didn’t take action as often and as sort of solely and full-heartedly as she does then, then the kingdom might have been last and she and Paul, this may never found their way back to each other.

0

00:31:20
Yeah, I think, I think you’re right. I thought also think that this play has, is playing with the idea of what kinds of couples do we want in sort of What ending due they bring and what, in, in the sort of idealization of, of the, a heteronormative coupling as As the ideal, I mean, part of what this, this play is doing is, is exploring the sort of detachment between sibling type love or bedfellow type love between say Celia and Rosalyn and really stretching that apart and looking at the detachment there.

0

00:32:06
And then it sort of exchanging that first attachment with, with a new one. And there were some great exceptions, I mean, and that’s the, those, the people we get married at the end. Right. But the, the great thing is that they’re, there are other things going on here. So its not just about that coupling, but it’s also about the, the detachment in reattachment of brothers, the Dukes and all of our and Orlando and Jacques, the boys.

0

00:32:37
And it’s so its looking at that, its looking at the detachment and reattachment in a different way of, or a Rosalind in Celia. So it’s looking, it’s looking at all kinds of couplings and exploring more or less we have are the right fit. And a, there are some people in the plate who do have the right fit to make the right fit. Umm, and then there was some people in the plate who don’t have a ball by the end of people like a senior in people like Jaquis who, who our there and don’t they’re is not a partner for them.

0

00:33:18
A I think that’s

4

00:33:20
Known is potentially that person.

0

00:33:23
Well, well I think I touched on would disagree, but, but Jake’s may not. Do you know what I mean? Yeah.

4

00:33:36
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4

00:34:11
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0

00:34:17
I think for Jake’s or Jacqui’s the, the, he, you know, his job is his, his sort of character dr. Is to sort of push people away. He, and, and so it’s hard for him to have a partner. I think there’s an interesting queer reading on that character that can be pretty compelling and that, that accounts for his sort of lack of a partner at the end.

0

00:34:47
But I think that’s as a, as a general rule, I think that coupling and uncoupling as is a part of what the plight is exploring if it’s exploring anything. Yeah. Well, I find it interesting too, the, the, the characters who were left without a paring on the stage because I, unlike other plays, I mean, when I looked at the ending of a merchant and I looked at Antonio who is left a note of pairing when almost everybody else’s paired off in some form or fashion and, and Shylock as well, there’s, there’s a very tragic element that could be played at the end of that.

0

00:35:20
A in this way, it doesn’t feel like it though. You know, like Duke sr ends up in the position that he wanted me, the first place, Jake, we actively makes the decision to go off and, and, and pursue a life that he feels is worthwhile. And I think that the ending of these different characters is quite representative perhaps with maybe one of the things is trying to suggest

3

00:35:38
To the audience is, you know, what does satisfaction in life look like? What does happiness look like? What are the different forms that it takes place in for every individual? Again, we have a lot of characters and other place from the cannon that, and alone and, and sadly, but Jake We, I mean has been sardonic and cynical and jaded as we talked about throughout the course of this conversation so far, but he doesn’t seem to resentful are upset about the idea of going back to live in the forest. Like, what is his draw towards that kind of like nomadic simpler life, a life? I think there’s a lot of commentary around the idea of like living in nobility or living like urban the style life’s or versus the kind of country or, or a more simple life quote, unquote, if that’s a fair thing to say, and I think Jake, we may be, has found some solace or some peace in that that is worth exploring too.

2

00:36:25
Yeah. There’s definitely an idealization of the pastoral life, like for sure, because the, there is a, there is a resounding freedom that Roslyn and Celia in particular fined in the forest, their without the, without the oppressive is sort of strictures of court without the seamstress, listening to them without a blooming father. The, you know, another thing from Hamlet, right? The evil uncles got straight out of Hamlet, but you know, in the forest and, and in sort of male attire that the combination of those, or I should say the intersection of that have that cross dressing and that, that liminal pastoral space where the, the social protocols no longer apply quite so much, Rosalyn has the freedom to Like fully inhabit her agency.

2

00:37:23
And so she can do strange things because she is allowed to, or rather not allowed to, or maybe there’s no, there’s nothing, there’s no system in place to curb her in the, in all of the ways that there would be back in court. And what’s so interesting to me is that Orlando has that freedom as well. I mean, he’s, he’s a, he’s a man. So even at, you know, even denied so much of his inheritance by his brother, Oliver, even at court, he always did have his male privilege, but like he goes into the forest and we, we get a true sense of who he is and who he is, is just an absolutely endearing romantic, like a very kind of open hearted open-minded kind of insecure and donkeys guy and Andy, he is, he just, he is allowed to like live in that sort of that state, that right brained, floofy state.

2

00:38:17
And he, you know, even when he goes up against Jake wes’, who is trying to puncture that personality, Orlando stands firm and, and, and has a really wonderful sort of pithy responses, but he refuses to let Jake, we have shame him for, for having qualities that Mae in the masculine world of the court’s a feminine.

0

00:38:39
Yeah, I think that’s, I think that’s true. I also think there’s like to understand what’s going on with, with some of these characters and their coupling or their, their sort of conscious detachment from that world. We have to sort of talk about what the Elizabeth and the Jack being a sort of take on sexuality and friendship is just part. And like that’s when people talk about this, play a part of what they talk about is that, and, and sometimes Jake’s comes up, but definitely Rosalind and Celia is a relationship come, comes up and a Ganymede in Orlando’s relationship because all of those things on some level feel queer to us in the modern world.

0

00:39:29
I’m on some level and, and the, the best in simplest where they can describe this, although there is, there is much a delicious scholarly work on this. The best way I can describe it is that that same sex relationships w which, which are cousins, brothers, sisters, cousins, best friends have the intimacy in them that we today mostly ascribe to Like marriage or cohabitation are cohabitating couples.

0

00:40:07
That’s the center of intimacy. Not, not necessarily, I should say all Like heterosexual, married, couple where those relationships are sort of getting meted out in sort of contractual arranged arrangements between the families, right? So its your intimacy, your close, vulnerable, personal relationship is happening with that other person with the same sex. And it’s so it’s, it’s intimate basically on every level, those people are sleeping together sometimes in all senses of that word.

0

00:40:45
And sometimes they’re just like, like Sharon, the same bed. Yeah. It’s and so it’s the best way I can describe it is that that its, its as intimate as lovers, but it doesn’t require them to be lovers, but some, they are a lover’s anyway, that make sense. And, and that’s part of what I think this play is calling us, calling our attention too, is to look at that kind of intimacy and how it’s had, how it can be manufactured, who has it sort of authentically and, and all of, all of that sort of thing now.

0

00:41:28
And so thank you for listening to my monologue, but also I just want to say that I think some of the play is about

3

00:41:34
Words and literacy versus its opposite. And so Rosalind is a person who has literacy and its, its working up here and Orlando is a person who doesn’t have those words who doesn’t have literacy coming from the heart about how they are unlock each other and a certain way they have to each other. Right? Yeah.

2

00:41:59
Oh absolutely. I mean she, she melts around Orlando even, even if she goes galloping around with her words, she absolutely is in, in Nam word with him. And I think it’s because he is just so there’s like an open valve on his heart.

3

00:42:16
I think speaking of like the heart and Orlando’s expression of love and, and all these characters relationship to love. I think the one thing that this play does so beautifully is an exploration of the different meanings of love. And I always go like the Greek definitions of love because they had all these different variants of the word, a gap arrow was a failure story. And I had always a struggle over these last to Xenia in Finland, which is here, but it’s amazing to watch all these characters come to life on the stage and these different explorations, like obviously the love of a love of religion or a love of worship type of the dynamics.

3

00:42:51
But then specifically the one that I find is highlighted the most and this place arrows a love of equals a hell of a friendship comradery. A, we see that between Celia and Rosalind. We see that between Orlando and a lot of the other male characters on the stage and obviously Like touchstone jQuery as well. And then the love of knowledge, the love of study. I mean, we really capture that through our jQuery as well. And then obviously also all with all the parent dynamics that are taking place on the stage and then the allegiances that come from the children in terms of their parentage kind of how they shift and go back and forth.

3

00:43:21
And as you talked about earlier, Jeremy like, This a reunification of these characters coming back together. Like these families being reunited like saga as well. And so it’s, I don’t find that its very often that we get such full capturing a etiologies of a lot of in one singular plan. And I think that’s what one of the greatest strengths of this play is in particular.

2

00:43:41
Yeah. So, well I’d love to hear you talk about Jacqui’s. Why, why him, why are you love him? Why like what connects you to him? And also I want to make sure we talk, we just touch on the seven ages of man speech because you were an absolute pro on the day of you read the speech even with my amendment and I’d love to talk about it. And I just loved to dive into that character. So

3

00:44:07
Sure. It’s not a problem. Yeah. I mean I’ve always felt quite a natural affinity or at least character that are fairly much cut in their heads possibly because I am similar in those ways. But at the end of the day, I find that Shakespeare uses these characters as a conduit to speak directly to the audience a in a very, a advisory type of role. It seems. I mean, we see with Hamlet to when he’s talking about the actor speech, for instance, because speech I pray you and do so on the tongue, umm, there are so many of these characters that are in their heads throughout the course of the entire play that speak directly to, to the audience giving advice to the audience like helped to try and course out maybe the message of the piece or the ideas that exist within the piece.

3

00:44:44
And beyond that too. I mean like the As you talked about, Claire like the sardonic nature of the character, the jaded cynicism of him. I just love the width that he brings into each, each moment that he’s a part of. And then his dynamic with Orlando too is absolutely hilarious. Like just this constant back and forth of like all Loverboy will enjoy being up in the clouds. Like I’m going to be back down here on earth and Orlando is being like, all right man, whatever. I don’t really care. And so Jeremy being caught up so much in the Like ideals of life that he kind of misses the meaning of life in the first place.

3

00:45:14
And, and I find that that’s maybe a, a, a motivator for his decision to return to that pastoral life in a way to try and figure it out more. And I find that he is just one of those few he’s one of those characters in the Canon that just doesn’t have his story resolved by the end of the play. And, and I always find those characters in themselves to be fascinating because usually there’s this nice, pretty bow wrapped up on a, a, a lot of the different characters by the end of each play. And then I just find it so far, not so pretty the boat has an end or not so pretty. Yeah.

3

00:45:45
Yeah, for sure. But it’s, it’s all to say, is that just, there’s usually some sort of finalization on character dynamics. So I find myself absolutely captivated by characters who don’t get a resolution and, and Jay Curry is one of them. And then we talked a little bit about merchant and Antonio is one of them and Shylock in a way is one of them I believe like I don’t believe Shylock just walks off that stage and that story is resolved. And I like her ratio, I find is one of them as well. Like talking about Hamlet earlier. And I think that there is something within these characters, like a, there was something that was talked to me back in university that kinda stuck with me in the way it was The it was the philosophy that it’s the last character on stage or the last character that’s alive or the last character whose story stories, unresolved, that is the actual focus of the piece.

3

00:46:26
And so I find myself very right and, and I think they’re is something to that. I don’t think it’s necessarily always correct, but I do think that there is some attention that should be drawn to these, a very complicated characters who really, and they tend to be the philosophical characters, the ones that are very much caught up in the meaning of things, the story that’s just unfolded. The the experience of the main characters wrote the piece, right? I mean, at the end of each play, the protagonist are almost always resolved whether they die, whether they marry, whether they are satisfied, they get what they wanted from the beginning, whatever the role may be, the protagonist’s are always the one that are wrapped up, but then these side characters are left to wonder what their role is.

3

00:47:08
And I think that that is a good segue into the seven ages of a man, all the world’s a stage speech right there. So actually I kind of wanted to pick your brains first. A what, what do you think of this speech? If that’s okay for me to ask,

0

00:47:21
Go for it. Jeremy okay. So I have mixed feelings. This speech have you, I should say I’ve used it a lot. Like I use it in Like device theater courses and things like that to do, to do work with students because I think it it’s sort of universality helps there’s a hook for everybody in it. And that’s of course, by design the parts of it that I don’t like are that it feels like a set piece.

0

00:47:59
It feels like Shakespeare actually have a good idea for seven ages of man speech at some other time, like to bring that up, both may be true, but I, the Tuesday afternoon and he was struck by the music for a play to right around us. And that’s the, that’s the part that I don’t like. I don’t know that that’s, that’s not entirely the fault of the play as much as it is, how we, as a culture kind of elevated the speech too, Bob or in a mental position and, and the way that we have made it.

0

00:48:48
I also do think that the play allows actually has lots of these things in it that it allows for in is about these are the sort of set pieces to be dropped in. I mean, another example earlier, or one of his earlier later, umm like the drop-ins of the sonnets or Orlando has written. And then later, later the drop-ins of the songs that have by the pages and other things.

0

00:49:22
And then of course the dropdown at the end, from, from Hyman is, is all about sort of as like As You Like It it’s like Love’s, Labour’s lost in this way to where is it’s about language and form in those spots. And then the everything else has kind of an on ramp or an exit ramp to that piece, which is a lot of me talking about the stuff around the piece and not the piece, but umm, the, the great thing about this piece and the reason I think it does get lifted up is that its a, one of those things that is universal university relevant and contains within it like total truth and, and those are things I think to love about it for sure.

0

00:50:13
And then a few seconds, I definitely want to go chunk by chunk through this speech kind of break down a lot of the elements of it, but Claire, if I could hear your input on it as well, before we jump into that’s a part there,

2

00:50:24
I owe many of my thoughts, this speech too, the once and future Rosa Josie, the Director theater director and also the artistic director of upstart Crow collective in all women and non-binary theater company based out of Seattle, she directed As You Like It at the Oregon Shakespeare festival last year and actually cut this speech from the scene in which it appears. And because it is because I totally agree with you Jeremy it does not seem to fit the, the, the tenor of a story or really the plot at all at the point that it falls.

2

00:50:58
And she actually used it as an epilogue. So after the big marriage and dance, she brought the set for seven women, her seven female identifying actors together and they each took one of the seven ages and then all of her, a male identifying and non-binary yeah, I think just male identifying actors had lanterns and the lights in the, in the house just slowly went down throughout the whole speech until you were listening to it. And they were, everyone was just lit by these spinning, these spinning lanterns that made it look like the whole theater was like full of fireflies and she changed the second line and she and I had a long conversation about it.

2

00:51:40
And it’s, and as with As with Wiley, Wiley were in her drama, Turk of had on a show before S like in the year of our Lord 2020, or when they did it 2019 and in a play that is all about the malleability and fluidity of gender and gender roles. This, this, this speech suggest gender binary, like right there in the second line. And so she changed it, she changed it a, all the world’s a stage and all the people in it, nearly players. And she had, she had a gender norm nonconforming gender fluid and nonbinary actors in her company for four As You Like It.

2

00:52:17
She had nonbinary actor play a Audrey As Aubrey and use they them pronouns. And so for me, like this idea that the speech can simultaneously be a, a, a kind of like more in full and reflective, but also like very hopeful and truthful button on the story, as opposed to it just being something that Jake We says to the Duke and his friends in the middle of a scene that is otherwise sort of light and lifting lifted, but that it also can be that it doesn’t actually need to be prescriptive to gender.

2

00:52:54
Those were two things that I really carried with me. And so even though I left the speech where it falls in my adaptation that we read together, I did change that second line because I like it so much more. And I think from henceforth, I will always use that change cause its a really, for me it’s a really lovely way of being so much more inclusive and in such a simple way to an inclusive have the potential truths that are in there because I think that the speech is a very truthful, I don’t get it though. Like, like, and so that’s what I mean when I say like it’s, it’s, it’s inspired by Rosa Like I don’t know what to do with it.

2

00:53:28
I hate it in the same way that I hate to be or not to be, because it doesn’t feel like it fits the play, the, the, the playwright and this doesn’t fit you’re story. This is just a thing you wrote that you thought was good and you plugged it in almost like a, almost like a song into a musical, right? Like it’s almost like those jukebox musicals that they did with like Cole Porter where its like, you know, that this song had, he did not write it for the story, but they plug it in any way cause its a tune and people know that’s kind of how I feel about it. So yeah, I don’t, I don’t get it on some way.

2

00:54:00
I feel like, or I feel like I’m missing the magic. Everyone talks about to be, or not to be in the same way. And I’m like, I don’t get it. I don’t get it. Right. People care. So, so yeah, I have, I have mixed in self contradictory feelings about the speech.

3

00:54:15
Well, and, and I, you know, it’s funny, I’ve heard this fun, interesting theory and, and I don’t know if there’s a way to prove it, but I think it would be an interesting thing to at least explore or is that a It was postulated at once over drinks that perhaps speeches like this, Momentus kind of have an intermission break, go get a drink type of a thing. So if you came back in the middle of it, you caught a lot of the themes that were in the play, but you were able to kind of just piece it together and keep moving forward, which I found to be funny, but you know, It, I think the reason that if it stands out so much to people is because it doesn’t quite fit in the moments that they happen in the play you’re talking about to be, or not to be in.

3

00:54:47
You’re talking about all the world’s of stage and, and both of those soliloquies to happen at a strange point in the flow, in the progression of a piece one earlier on when later on, obviously. But I think that’s why people remember it. That’s why its kind of worshiped is because its often taken as this isolated piece as opposed to recognize as its place within the piece itself. I agree that this speech in terms of the progression of the plot probably does belong somewhere else. But I think that one of the things, a lot of people get caught up on his, the individual ages themselves as opposed to looking at the speech ends in how the speech starts.

3

00:55:20
And I think that obviously for anybody who has read the speech or a performance speech, there’s a cyclical element that is addressed in this entire speech. And we go through and we address all of these different archetypes of these characters that are being played by all of us at different points in our lives. And I think that this is the beauty of it. This is why a lot of people connect with it as big as a, like you would both said is that every single actor, performer audience member can find one of these ages to connect to. But I think that’s the trap of this piece. I think that’s the trap of the soliloquy is that we are looking to connect with an individual age as opposed to recognizing what all the ages together represent a four, the audience.

3

00:55:53
And, and as I had spoken about earlier, perhaps what Shakespeare was trying to share with the audience using jQuery as a conduit, ah, and we see this a lot with Shakespeare and a lot of is a more thoughtful characters is a quick address to how we think things could be or should be. And so we begin with all the world’s a stage and all of these, all the people in it, merely players, they have their exits and their entrances obviously. And having some illusions towards a birth and death and one person in their time plays many parts, seven ages. And then we go through, we have the infant, we have the lover, we have the soldier, we have the justice a, we have old age and then we finally have second childishness again.

3

00:56:28
And, and that is the part of the speech that I really do want to address because its so easy for us to, you know, at different points in my life. I can certainly be like, Oh yeah, like I, I have identified with the lover and that’s kind of what I connect with. So I played a lover during the Stuart at the end of the speech, but the nihilism of Jake We has to come through. If we lose that Nicholas and throughout the piece, we can kind of lose the meaning of it. We slip back into second childishness and everything starts to fade away slowly. We have spent so much time putting the emphasis onto the archetypes that we play the understanding of ourselves, the understanding of the world around us, based on these fine profiles that have been laid out.

3

00:57:03
Are you a lover? Are you a soldier? Are you a whining school, boy? You know, are you Romeo? Are you Juliet? Are you Macbeth? Are you, are you Antonio? One of the school bus always think of Antonio for whining school boy, but really at the end of it. And I think What why this speech actually works quite well in this place. We were talking a lot about the ability to break away from expectations, the ability to break away from what maybe a, an urban lifestyle or a Royal noble lifestyle might suggest a in terms of how you should behave.

3

00:57:34
Right? And we see characters flourish into their own and really seize who they are. I’m in this whole speech says, you know, here are the seven archetypes that we kind of profile ourselves as and classify ourselves as, but what does it mean at the end of it? At the end of all this, this, the entire life each other’s lives, the, the lives that we are getting to take apart it with each other, right? It, it nothing literally it is absence of meaning.

4

00:57:59
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3

00:58:23
Perhaps I think what is being explored here is that if we live our lives by archetypes, if we never take the chance to really understand ourselves and, and the people that are close to us or the world around us in more meaningful ways that are removed from these archetypes, we live a life of absent, meaning if we lose everything by the end, including our own knowledge and awareness of the world around us. And I think that is why this, this speech actually works quite well in this play is because it’s a direct address to the expectations. All these characters were once living versus the characters they decide to be throughout the course of the play.

3

00:58:55
And some of them do still end up as the archetype that is listed here, but that’s their choice. There’s a difference in that. And in their own ways, they all come to acknowledge or appreciate each other’s choices and who they want to be. And so, yeah, if we’re, if we’re talking about the importance and, and the significance of this speech, I think moving away from the understanding of the archetypes that are outlined within it, because as we’ve seen with Benedict Cumberbatch is performance for BBC where they did that. Like wonderful. A video montage of at the focus is a very on the seven different ages, but not so much the absence of meaning.

3

00:59:25
And we are seeing this a lot, actually, one of the few that I’ve seen through this really well in terms of capturing the absence of meaning, if we live by our own lives is a Richard Pascoe from RSC a during the plain Shakespeare series that John Martin or a C publish back in the early seventies, I believe he does this wonderful Like various is probably the most nihilistic Jacqui portrayal I’ve ever seen, but you know, when he hits that end and he talks about oblivion and a The like the losing of the teeth, the eyes, the tastes, and then eventually everything.

3

00:59:56
It really hit that note for me, where the speech just started to make sense. We can’t conform to these archetypes, that we can’t force other people to conform to these archetypes. And if we do either of those two things, we are losing and destroying the meaning of our existence in the first place, which as an absurdist philosopher in this study is, is subjective. We create our own meaning. We have to, if there’s no objective inherent meaning in life. So what do we do with that knowledge? We can either sit in the nihilism in the anguish of it as characters like Hamlet and Jay can we do, or we can find meaning in it as maybe Orlando or a ratio does.

3

01:00:29
And that’s my 2 cents on that story for that. Thank you. I mean, everything you say Make makes me think of how of the touchpoints that This has with kind of a Buddhist notions of a time where, you know, Like in Buddhism, there’s a, there’s a conscientious meditation on death and it is meant exactly to detach you from all of the roles that you put on. Right. And, and get you to confront the, the self that’s underneath all of that.

3

01:01:00
And I think I’m much of what you say is, is pointing us in that direction. Yeah, I think it’s lovely. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. Claire please.

2

01:01:10
Well, I was just gonna say, what, what is curious to me then about this speech is that for all that, it seems to reveal an innate nihilism in Jacqui’s. He ends the play by saying, I’m going to seek out this. I’m going to seek out this religious man and try to find meeting with the Duke. So he doesn’t, he doesn’t end the play saying like, I’m going to, you know, I’m going to go live monastically and, and just wait for the inevitable end, because life is meaningless and there’s no point.

2

01:01:40
He says, I’m going to go seek out this religious figure who has transformed him a tyrant like Duke Frederick. And I’m going to see if he has anything that he can tell me that will, that will bring some sort of similar revelation or restitution to my, to my soul. So its like, he’s a nihilist, but unlike certain characters, he, he seems there seems to be an, a, a flame inside of him that doesn’t want to be like, there’s a part of him that actually doesn’t want to be as cynical as he is. And that’s what makes him so fascinating to me. I think that characters who are just cynics are so boring, but I think that characters who are cynical because they’re because it’s covering up or it is a way of coping with something, those characters are so interesting.

2

01:02:23
I’m writing an adaptation of a stage adaptation of a tale of two cities right now. And the absolute best thing about the character Sydney carton is it, he is an actually a cynic. He presents is one, but it is absolutely is a coping mechanism. And so that is, that is something I can sink my teeth into. And I think this is often because we have so many male, male characters and male creators who think that Like cynicism for its own sake is inherently interesting. And I would argue that it’s, it’s really not. But cynicism that is, that is a mask cynicism or cynicism.

2

01:02:56
That is, Oh, a way of guarding or protecting or a something that is actually characteristic are trying to shake off. Like they don’t want to think that life is meaningless, but they, they have been so hurt and wounded by life that now they kind of do and are looking for looking for a way out, which is how we approach Mirabelle with weight of the world. Th the world have made him into a cynic and he desperately didn’t want to be anymore. So those, those characters are fascinating to me. And I think that J Quis is a choice in the end to go join Duke Frederic.

2

01:03:27
And the religious man shows that Like whatever his, whatever, his nihilism like it isn’t all there is. Or at least he doesn’t want it to be all there is. And that’s what, that’s what really connects me to the character.

3

01:03:41
The, and I find it so much of what you’ve just said to be absolutely fascinating. Cause I completely agree like cynicism for the sake of being cynical, Like doesn’t play well at all the way it needs to come from a place. And I mean, one thing I do find very interesting what this speech, as well as how well it captures something that is explored in psychology of trauma, which is kind of like the separation of different chunks of our lives is kind of a different story altogether. And the recreation of oneself entering a new age. If your life, you know, you enter high school and you create a new version of yourself, you enter college or university, you enter a new age of yourself, you’ve graduated from college or university or the next stage of yourself, but it’s one coherent storyline that you are still the same person you were back then you’ve just grown and developed since then.

3

01:04:20
But by separating your life into these separate stories and, and sometimes people even viewed them as not even as part of the same series of stories, ah, we actually limit our understanding in our awareness of ourselves. And I think that’s a danger and, and I do find, I agree completely. Like I don’t see Jake resending as a, like a sad or a tragic thing where he’s kind of like separated in a loan from all the characters. Cause he goes, seeking out is meaning, cause purpose. And, and I think there’s a lot of power in that. And we actually see and sorry to keep bring a pamphlet, but the comparison is so palpable is that Like we actually see him went through the same thing, Oh, this is cotton.

3

01:04:54
It’s a intellectual thought of heightened philosophy and eventually decide you thought the world, but he actively decides, you know, I’m done thinking now is the time for action. And he follows through, and I think Jake We takes the same choice, but he isn’t a comedy. So it ends very differently for him. But yeah, so I think it’s a wonderful exploration,

0

01:05:18
But yeah, for anybody who was ever working on these types of characters who are cynical jaded, you really have to ask yourself why and find some, the depth of that character. I, and I, and I actually agree with you a lot. Jeremy is a guy like you talked about the, the potential of Jake we were to be representative of, of queer communities. And I think that is an absolutely phenomenal representation that this character can take on, especially if you’re staging in a very classical LenSx in terms of, of a traditional staging. I think there’s a lot of power that can be brought in through the character through that. And again, that kind of archetype will profiling that it can exist in those dynamics with, throughout the play.

0

01:05:52
And you know, why he’s a little bit more flustered and frustrated with the other characters that are like Orlando, just very hard on the sleeve, not really care about the opinions. I also think a, and this may be both reductive and controversial, but I also think he is, he is written as a clown. It’s a, it’s a different clown. It’s more like Festy and that certainly touched on. Right. But, but part of the point is for him to sort of like p**s on everybody else’s parade and umm, and to, to sort of do that Tea to be the down energy up to and including the point where he, he basically stops the party at the end yes.

0

01:06:39
To draw attention back to himself and sorta F you audience. Right. Well see on the audience there on state and the other characters and, and the that’s part of the, the point and the drive, I think behind him two is, is that he’s their as a foil and a fool to a sort of push us in the other direction and to keep us from, to give us some medicine with the sugar as Mary Poppins might say,

4

01:07:13
Love that. I mean, there’s really no Shakespeare play. They wouldn’t be improved if Mary Poppins flew in

0

01:07:21
The other thing while we’re still on, Jake’s forbid the, the, the, the touch points between Jake’s touchstone and Rosalind and Orlando too, it to a degree. And Sylvia’s is that all of these characters are collecting something. They are collecting beauty, they are collecting short stories. They’re collecting bits of poetry, they’re collecting experiences. And, and Jakes is like the The the collector who I would argue is actually collecting maybe an, a book and like I’m paging through.

0

01:07:59
And, Oh, I, I encountered the, all the world’s a stage Sweet somewhere and it seems appropriate for this. So I’m just going to read it to you like out of a hymnal. And there is something where that the quality of As You Like It as a whole and certainly quality of Jake’s

3

01:08:16
Is As maybe its chief emblem in a lot of ways, his, that collection, its like a Chatbook of unrelated things, unrelated character’s unconnected stories rolls that we put on an ad like it’s this This pastiche or a quilt that is sorta some together and its odd the way its put together, but at works and to touch on that, that in my, in my last point about the speech in particular, its there’s just so much too impact in it with your looking at it as an, as a nice way to a piece of part of the plate as a whole.

3

01:08:55
I do find it interesting that a most of the ages are captured as, and then, and then, and then, but the two ages that aren’t is at first the infant and, and an almost unconscious state of being and just existence, right? And then obviously the six stage shifts. And so we refer to these two ages and I think there’s something really powerful to explore on the six agent. If we were to take your direction on this is the jQuery is leafing through a book and he finds this passage. He feels is appropriate for this is very much finding like the comedic tempo and pacing of it. But in the six age, that’s where his shift actually happens.

3

01:09:26
His awareness of the situation. That’s the tragedy of what’s taking place now and what can be prevented because they talk of Shakespeare speaks of this shift into old age. But then this, this line here is always something that catches me because the initial reading of it is obviously like, Oh, there’s a double entendre here. It’s very funny. A his youthful hose well saved a world to wide for his shrunk shank, right? But the power of this is also referring obviously to Like pants and how they have over time worn down.

3

01:09:56
And you’ve been saving them for this special occasion with a special occasions. I’ve never risen. So you kept waiting and waiting and waiting and waiting and kind of the relation that, that can also take to personality and identity. You keep waiting, you keep preserving, you keep waiting for the right moment, the right people, the right place, the right time. But in all that time of like restricting yourself from your identity and, and who you choose to be, In want to be, you’ve deteriorated over time. And suddenly there’s less value in, in special uniqueness of you in that. And it’s unfortunate that for a lot of people and for a lot of characters in the cannon that this awareness doesn’t come until the old age, I mean, look a leader as well as another character who realizes in his old age approaching second childishness that does that transition to that character is that awareness of his faults, the architect he put himself in to versus who he could have been for his daughters and for his people.

3

01:10:45
Right. And I, I think there’s such a power to explore within that last chunk of this piece is the shift of a profiling ourselves in the architypes there’s an architypes in the awareness of how wrong, an incorrect that his, for our own existence in lives.

2

01:11:00
Yeah. And also just the very basic rule of don’t procrastinate because your time is limited. Life is actually ultimately a femoral. I mean, for God’s sake, someone dive into Hamlet and tell what this speech and just Like help the boy out. But I do think that that what you’re pointing to well is that actually is the medically relevant we’re as in it to me, because it stands directly in contradiction to Rosalyn who does not wait.

2

01:11:31
She does not procrastinate. She just jumps in guns, blazing chin high, you know, like wordplay at the ready sheet. She just like, she jumps into life. Once she is being a neat, she jumps into the middle of the action often, literally. And she just like pulls herself into, into the middle of the world and it’s the middle of relationships and she just does things and yes, we can call her reckless or, you know, impetuous are impatient.

2

01:12:03
We can absolutely unpack the cruelty that she, you know, flings at Phoebe. But like she, she is on some level, she is active in a way that’s so few characters. And so few people are, and Rosalyn was such an important character for me growing up. It was like her and Emma Woodhouse were the two heroines that I Like needed in my life when I was 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, because I was always called bossy. And I was always called the impatient.

2

01:12:35
And I was always, you know, like culturally well from my peers and from people that were older than me, like I was always told like, step back, sit down, set up. Like, this is not your place we don’t want to hear from you. And Emma and Roz are both such Like they’re directors. They’re I think they’re both like theater directors. They both have that instinct in them to, to micromanage and to keep their hands messy and to like jump into in the middle of the action and do everything, incense, everything, and, and, and be the generator of decisions and choices.

2

01:13:10
Umm, and to push things forward to whatever conclusion they desire. And so when Rosalyn and shake, we is ultimately meet in this play, its so funny, cause you can tell from their conversation and he wants so desperately to be cynical about her. He wants to be able to just write her off the way he is written off Orlando. And he can’t because she’s so freaking smart. She’s so smart and she’s so quick and he’s like, Oh you’re sort of great. Your kind of awesome your or your boyfriend, your boyfriend’s pretty stupid, but you’re kind of great.

2

01:13:41
And Like, and I think it’s because on some level he recognizes that she represents the sheer majesty of not waiting for life and not, not like holding out, but just embracing the moment and living in the moment and, and doing when you can.

3

01:13:59
Well, in the end, I think the Like like you had said, is that a Roslyn representing the antithesis of the speech of taking action in the moment and defining itself in your own role on it, you know, jQuery is left at the end of the play without a sense of meaning or identity. It doesn’t quite get, Like never make clear what he wants and he doesn’t get what he wants because he doesn’t know what he wants. Right. Otherwise though, these other characters who have learned to identify like create their own identity, create their own goals, create throne, meaning create their own pursuits, right. They all get what they want by the end of the play. And this is not an uncommon thing on the Canon to characters who decide what they want often end up getting what they want, whether that’s for a tragic spin or a comedic spin.

3

01:14:37
It, it does turn out in their favor if you live, if they live truly by their wants. Right. And, and their identity. And I think it really does say something that Jake We doesn’t and, and kind of the capturing of the speech. I think that’s why he’s so infatuated, Rosalyn, because he sees this is incredibly intelligent creative when the person who knows what she wants and goes for it and doesn’t really cross out into the wind and he doesn’t get that. And it’s so removed from his own world in his own understanding of it. And yet its working for her. And then also with Orlando, like he gets so flustered and frustrated with him, like calling on basically like lover boy, like get your head down from the clouds type of energy and, and the teasing.

3

01:15:12
And like he’s interacting with all these different touchstones as well. Like absolutely fascinated with a touchstone, right. The characters who speak to what they wanted to speak, to say what they wanted to say and do what they want to do. And that’s what they want. And Jake, we struggled with that and that, and I think that the speech occurs earlier in the plane, maybe for that reason, it’s an awareness and a progression of his own character and understanding of what he’s doing wrong. And, and maybe there’s a lot of character study to do. And that in terms of his final decision to leave and go elsewhere.

2

01:15:39
Yeah. He’s to maybe is taking a leaf out of Rosalyn’s book. He’s like, well, she just decided that she wanted this and she went after it. Maybe I’ll try the same. Yeah.

3

01:15:51
Powerful message. There’s an interesting conversation. That’s the only time they really talked to each other where they’re there, they’re touching sort of on that, that notion right. Where they’re talking about what experiences have they tried? The note from Rosalind to try to Jake’s is a well, umm, you have a lot of experience, but you, you, its sort of a shame that that’s all you have. You don’t have, you know, the, the, the phrase is escaping me, but the implication is you don’t have an actual thing.

3

01:16:28
You don’t have a relationship, don’t have any of your hands. Right. So you don’t have any money, which is the The roll take on that. Right. All you have is This this sort of Like collection of things. You don’t have anything real. And that’s the note there that I think speaks to some of what you’re saying. Yes. In any case, that’s all I really have to say about the speech and bakery as a whole laugh at this little tidbit is a very small, a little bit that I had to say. Thank you so much for listening to me.

3

01:16:58
Ramble.

2

01:16:59
No I’m so I’m so glad you did. Cause I had gotten those. I couldn’t, I don’t know. I don’t have enough to say about him, so no, thank you so much for, for unpacking it and for sort of going into such detail about it. That’s just marvelous. And I think if you can’t, you really can’t talk about this place. Certainly not in the deep dive format, without diving into one of that, you know, that famous, famous speech, one of the most famous he ever wrote as As curved Bolishak, as it can feel in the course of the play, I think that you bring up a lot of points.

2

01:17:30
We’ll about how it could be integrated or how the ideas and themes of it can actually be woven into the one of the, of the action. And I really liked to do that on some level Roslyn inspires him. I think if I ever directed it, that would be a thread that I would like to tug on because it seems true to her who she is and what she represents in the world of the play. And it also is very helpful to me that a character who is so self isolated, if not, if not literally then like mentally, he is self isolated that he can be inspired and emboldened to chase what he wants.

2

01:18:11
Even if he doesn’t quite know what it is by a young woman who does that. I don’t know. I like that. I like that as an interpretation for the two of them, especially if Jake MES is being played by a male presenting actor, there’s something really lovely about a, about that notion.

3

01:18:28
And I think it’s as simple as just Jake wee, having a sincere Goodby to specifically Rosalind does, he is doing his exit off the stage, speaking of where he’s going to go and like just, yes, everyone else’s around. Yes. He’s said dynamics all of these other characters. But by specifically going in saying goodbye to Roslyn, I think in that you could really capture that energy and that essence you’re speaking,

2

01:18:46
That would be really lovely. And I, that is actually, again, like I’ve talked on the show before, how I’ve a very few number of dream roles. Cause I just do not rate my acting abilities that highly I’m very, very introverted, very scared of being an actor, but, but she has of mine because I, I love, I love how fast her mind works and its one of the, it’s one of those things that I just like really connect too, is that she just she’s like F unstoppable faucet of words often through our own detriment, but she just like her brain just goes a million miles an hour.

2

01:19:19
And that really speaks to me. And I would love to explore the delight that she and Jake, we can take each other because I think he also has a mind that works a million miles an hour. He, I don’t think he talks as fast as she goes. I think she, she is like, she’s just like, I dunno, what’s a really, really fast moving bird. Like what birds go really, really hummingbird. She’s like a hummingbird. And I don’t think that he is a hummingbird. However, I do think that his synapses are firing at the rate that her’s are.

2

01:19:50
So when they finally meet each other, it’s like, Oh this is fun. We may, we may disagree, but we can, we can do this all day. And, and he does, he says goodbye to all of the couples when he’s leaving. And it would be so lovely if he went over to her civically and that maybe he talks to the other people, but that there is something that happens. But

4

01:20:08
To have them to represent their, their authentic goodbye dammit. Well, we get to do this play.

3

01:20:15
I want to smell bad. They are, like I said, its it’s a dream of mine to directed or at least play Jack Reed. The you know, just talking about the temperament of the two characters, like one being very fast, one being very slow. It reminds me so much of Stanislavski. Second book building character. There’s a, there’s a passage in there where a Stanislavski in this cohort of, of actors that are under study, enter the studio space and there’s like a hundred metronomes I’ll take a look at different tempos. And so you just get this chaotic whirlwind of ticking sounds all around you. Right? And, and the director of the space says to move, find, find a metronome and move in that tempo, move in that rhythm.

3

01:20:50
Right. And, and so all the actors begin moving and then there’s this one moment of harmony. And for anybody who’s heard multiple metronomes going at once. There’s a moment where just for a few seconds, everything ticks together. And I think that in that moment that you’re talking about like Rosalind and, and Jake We coming together. The first one, what they need is like tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, but the contrast at each other. But then that final, since your moment is fine, harmonic ticking together before he finally says goodbye. And I think that that there’s so much power that could be captured in that.

4

01:21:16
I love that. Yeah. Its a, its a son, a special curriculum play. I’m a fan. Yeah. That’s all I have unless you guys want to bring up anything. Is there anything we didn’t talk about that you want to make sure we touch on?

3

01:21:40
I think we’ve we poked enough holes in this speech.

4

01:21:46
Yeah. I’m I’m I’m happy to, to leave it off here. This has been a fantastic discussion.

3

01:21:52
Yeah. I just have to say I loved this play. It’s a, it’s a problematic mess and that’s what all these are. And so I, I could direct it every day until I die and I don’t think I would unpack it fully.

4

01:22:09
And that’s how I feel about LL. Right. Well, yeah. Well thank you so much for joining us. It was so great to have you on

3

01:22:20
Well thank you for having me. It’s always a privilege in that. I certainly learned a lot speaking with both of you and it was excellent meeting you for the first time. Jeremy nice to meet you.

4

01:22:28
Well, everyone listening. Thanks for joining us. We will see you next time. You’ve been listening to the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours. Our theme song was written by Owen. Eddie. This podcast was made possible by our friends@theartscounciloffayettevilleandcumberlandcountyandourfabulousmonthlysustainersatpatreon.com slash Sweet Tea Shakespeare. If you’ve enjoyed your time with us today, subscribe to this podcast or leave us a review on whatever platform you get your podcasts from.

4

01:22:58
Thanks again for listening to the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours until next time you that way we, this way.

The Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours | As You Like It Reading Pt. 1

In our regularly scheduled Lunch Hours spot this week, we have an intensive discussion about one of Shakespeare’s well-known comedies. Sweet  Tea Artistic Director Jeremy Fiebig and Assistant Artistic Director Claire F. Martin take a deep dive into Shakespeare’s As You Like It. What are your thoughts on this early modern comedy? Email us at hours@sweetteashakespeare.com to discuss!

Welcome to the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours, where we spend time well by spending it together. Think of the Hours as a way to pass the time around a common table of ideas. We’re a community seeking to delight in story, song, and stagecraft even as we confront a world of change and challenge.

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The Hours are only possible because of regular support from our monthly sustainers and patrons. Please consider making a monthly pledge on Patreon. With options beginning at just $5, and plenty of great perks, you’ll find a great way to join the STS family.

You can always contact the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours at hours@sweetteashakespeare.com.

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The show is produced by Claire Martin and Jeremy Fiebig and edited by Ashanti Bennett.

Jen Pommerenke and Julie Schaefer also assisted with this episode.

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This project is supported by the Arts Council in part by contributions from businesses and individuals, and through grants from the City of Fayetteville, Cumberland County and the North Carolina  Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources.

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1

00:01:11
Hello Welcome to the Sweet Tea Shakespeare Hours where we spend time. Well, by spending it together, I’m Claire Martin, as you like it by William Shakespeare scene one, enter Orlando and Adam

0

00:01:39
As well. I remember at him, it was a pun in this fashion. Be creeped me by a wheel, but w***e, a thousand crowns. And as they all say, just charged my brother on his blessing to breed MI. Well then it begins my sadness. My brother Jacquie. He keeps at school and reports speaks golden Leigh of his profit from my Part. He keeps me rustically at home or to speak more properly.
Stays me here at home unkept for calling you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth, that the further is not from the stalling of an ox, his horses, our bread better for besides that they are fair with their feeding. They are taught their manage. And to that end writers’ dearly higher, but I, his brother gain nothing under him, but growth. And besides this is nothing that he’s a plentiful. He gives me the, something of that nature gave me his countenance seems to take me from, he lets me feed with his Heinz bars.

0

00:02:50
Me the place have a brother. And as much as in him lies, mine’s my gentility with my education. This is it, Adam, that grieves me and the spirit of my father, which I think is within me, begins to mutiny against the servitude. I will no longer endure it though yet. I know no Wise remedy how it works.

2

00:03:14
Well, you under comes to my master, your brother,

0

00:03:21
Adam, and they’ll shout out here how he will shake me up

2

00:03:25
Now, sir. What make you here?

0

00:03:28
And I am not taught to make anything a what Mar you then sir, Mary, sir, I am helping you to Mar that, which God made a poor unworthy brother of yours with idleness,

2

00:03:41
Mary, sir. The better employed and B not a while.

0

00:03:47
Shall I keep your hogs and eat husks with them? What product is a portion? Have I spent that I should come to such in Newberry?

2

00:03:56
Well, no you where you are, sir. Oh,

0

00:04:00
A very well here in your orchid.

2

00:04:04
No You before whom sir.

0

00:04:05
Well, I better than him. I am before he knows me. I know you. Where are my eldest brother? And in this gentle condition of blood, you should so know me. The courtesy of nations allows you. My better in that you are the first born at the same tradition. It takes not a way in my blood. There were 20 brothers betwixt us. I have as much of my father and me as you I’ll bite. I confess you’re coming before me is near to his reverence. What?

0

00:04:35
Boy come Gumm. Elder brother. You are too young in this.

2

00:04:40
Nope. I’ll lay hands on me.

0

00:04:42
I have no feeling. I am the youngest son of a role in the boys who was my father. And he has three as a villain necess, such as a father. We got villains where they are not my brother. I would not take his hand from the throat till this other guy had pulled out that tongue for saying so that has railed on myself.

2

00:05:00
Sweet masters be patient for your father’s remembrance. Be a cord.

0

00:05:07
I will not tell Like Please you shall hear me. My father charged you in this world to give me a good education. You have to train me like a peasant, obscuring and hiding for a meal that gentlemen Like qualities. The spirit of my father grows strong in me and I will no longer endure it. Therefore allow me to such exercises. As may become a gentlemen or give me the poor. A lot of where my father left me by Testament with that, I will go by my fortunes

2

00:05:36
And we have to beg when that is spent to get you in. I will not be lumped troubled by You. You still have some part of your will. I prayed you leave me. I will know

0

00:05:47
Further offend you then becomes me for it, for my good

2

00:05:50
Get with him. You all a dog. It’s old dog, my reward. Most of you, I have lost teeth in your service.

3

00:05:59
God, be with my old master, he would not have spoke with such a word. Excellent Orlando. And you said even so began you to grow upon me. I will physic your rank and this and give you know, thousand a year. Neither of us who comes here. Well, the more OTO worship good once you’re Charles, ah, what’s the new news at the new court. There’s no knew at the court so that the old news and that is the old Duchess is banished by her younger brother at the new Duque and three or four loving Nobles of put themselves and the voluntary exile with LANs and revenues in rich, the new Duke, therefor, he gives them good leads to wander.

3

00:06:52
Can you tell if Rosalind the Duchess, his daughter be banished with her mother? No, for the Duke’s daughter, her cousins so loves her being ever from their cradles brought together that she would have followed her. Rosalind is that the court no less beloved of their uncle and his own door and never to ladies loved as they are. Where will the old Duchess live? They say she is already in the forest of Arden and many, a married lady with her and their, they live like the old are a Robin hood of England.

3

00:07:33
They say there’s many young curious flopped to her everyday and flea at the time carelessly as they did in the golden world. What you mean wrestle tomorrow? Before the new Duke, we do a search and I came to a quilt. You with a matter I am given so secretly to understand that your younger brother, Orlando has a disposition to come in, disguise against me to try out for tomorrow.

3

00:08:06
So I wrestled from my credit and either escapes me without some broken limbs, shut up, quit him. Well, your brother is, but young and tender. And for your love, I would be low to foil him as I must for my own honor. If he come in Charles, I thank you for that. I love to me which thou shalt find I will most kindly requite. I had myself a notice of my brother’s purpose here in and have by under it and to dissuade him from it.

3

00:08:45
But he is resolute all together. All the Charles, he is the stubbornness to a young fellow of France, full of ambition, an envious emulator of every man’s good parts, a secret and villainous can private are against me. Has Natural brother. Therefore you, is that a discretion I had As leaf fell did to break his neck has a finger. I’m only glad I came here are there to you.

3

00:09:16
If they come tomorrow, I’ll give in this payment. If it ever he go alone again, I’ll never wrestled the prize more. And so God keep your worship farewell. Good to Charles now. Well, I stir this and gamester, I hope I shall see an end to him from my soul yet. I know not why hates nothing more than he yet. He’s a gentle, never schooled.

3

00:09:47
You had to learn it full